Back in the old days the canonical example of an over-used effect was the HTML <blink> tag. One of the top candidates today has to be the ‘glow effect’. Having said that, if used judisciously, it can be a very effective effect. So, when should you use it and how can you implement it?

When to Use a Glow

The short answer to this is rarely. There are some very specific instances when an obvious, in your face glow is appropriate. Scenes that naturally include a source of illumination are the obvious use case. Examples include space scenes, aurorae, fires and flames, bio-luminescence, glass objects, neon signs, sunlight through windows, water and ice.

More common, and often over-done, are glow effects in logos and lettering.

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Perhaps the most common ‘correct’ usage would be in user interface elements such as glowing buttons etc.

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Finally, glows are often employed to produce more abstract images.

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How to Create a Glow in Photoshop

There are a thousand variations on a theme here but this should be enough of a recipe to get you started on the path to discovery.

  • Create a new layer and select it.
  • Use the Paint Bucket to fill it with black (#000000)
  • Select white as foreground color.
  • Select the Brush tool. Right-click anywhere on the image and set Master Diameter to 3px and Hardness to 100%.
  • Create a smooth curved path using the pen tool.
  • Right click the image, tick Simulate Pressure and select Stroke Path
  • Open the Paths window and click below the work path to deselect it.
  • Right click the layer and select Blending Options.
  • Tick Outer Glow and select it. Set an appropriate colour.